Grocery Outlet open newest store in Dayton, 33 new jobs created - Carson Now

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Grocery Outlet open newest store in Dayton, 33 new jobs created - Carson NowGrocery Outlet open newest store in Dayton, 33 new jobs created - Carson NowPosted: 04 Jun 2020 05:10 PM PDT Grocery Outlet press release Grocery Outlet Bargain Market, extreme-value grocery retailer, opened its newest location Thursday at 7 Dayton Village Parkway in Dayton, Nev., creating 33 new jobs in the community and providing big savings on name brand, high quality merchandise.Grocery Outlet stores are independently operated by local families who are committed to supporting their communities. "We are overjoyed to be a part of the Dayton community and be able to provide big savings on quality groceries," said IOs Daniel and Kathleen Knight in a news release. "This partnership with Grocery Outlet gives us the ability to grow our business, create new jobs and more importantly, give back to our local community."Grocery Outlet offers the same trusted brands as traditional grocery stores, but…

Forget planting trees. This company is funding 4 far-out carbon removal projects - Grist

Forget planting trees. This company is funding 4 far-out carbon removal projects - Grist


Forget planting trees. This company is funding 4 far-out carbon removal projects - Grist

Posted: 22 May 2020 12:59 AM PDT

Last August, a San Francisco–based tech startup called Stripe made a bold climate promise. The company, which makes software that enables online payments and is valued at $36 billion, was already investing in energy-efficiency projects to reduce its carbon footprint. It was also paying for carbon offsets for the emissions that it couldn't avoid, from things like business flights and the natural gas burned to heat its offices. But Stripe wanted to go even further to take action on climate change. The company announced it would spend an additional $1 million annually on emerging carbon removal technologies, bringing its carbon balance sheet into the black.

The announcement kicked off a vetting process in which Stripe solicited proposals and consulted with scientists to evaluate them. On Monday, it delivered on its promise, revealing its first four winners, which will be receiving about $250,000 each.

Though the amounts are small, the gesture is huge. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change has said that in order to prevent catastrophic climate change, we'll need to start actively pulling carbon out of the carbon cycle and permanently sequestering it. But a lot of the tools available to do so are still nascent and expensive, and will require the kind of leap-of-faith buy-in that Stripe is offering to help them scale up.

The carbon removal technologies Stripe chose are early stage, and currently remove carbon at a cost of between $75 and $775 per ton — a far cry from common carbon offset projects like forest conservation and methane capture from landfills, which typically cost less than $10 per ton. Stripe's $1 million will only sequester about 6,500 tons of CO2, assuming the earliest-stage projects it chose actually work.

Swiss-based ClimeWorks has the most established technology of the bunch, and is also the most expensive. ClimeWorks uses renewable energy to power machines that capture CO2 directly from the air and inject it deep underground, where it reacts with rock formations and hardens. The company says its pilot project will bury 50 tons of CO2 in 2020, and it's in the process of developing a larger plant that will capture several thousand tons of CO2 per year.

Charm Industrial's bio-oil, produced from biomass, will be injected underground Charm Industrial

Stripe also chose CarbonCure, a Canadian company that takes CO2 sourced from industrial emitters and incorporates it into concrete.

A third company, Charm Industrial, will use the money to test the viability of injecting bio-oil underground — sort of like reverse oil drilling. Bio-oil is a carbon-rich fluid produced by burning biomass like corn husks and rice straw that typically rot in the field; burying it underground removes it from the carbon cycle.

The fourth winner is Project Vesta, a startup founded by a guy who also markets supplements that allegedly enhance brain function. Project Vesta is working on a pilot study to prove the safety and efficacy of spreading a mineral called olivine on sandy beaches, where waves will break the olivine down, speeding up its ability to pull CO2 from the air.

If you're thinking that some of these projects sound a little out there, you're not alone. Some climate hawks and scientists have raised their eyebrows at the announcement. "I question whether the companies that they are supporting can scale," commented Jigar Shah, president of the clean energy investment firm Generate Capital, on Twitter. Volcanologist Erik Klemetti voiced concern that Project Vesta could have unintended ecosystem consequences.

But Jane Zelikova, chief scientist at Carbon180, a nonprofit focused on carbon removal, applauded Stripe for being a leader in the space.

"They're not the only company thinking about negative emissions or carbon removal," Zelikova said. "But they're certainly the first ones essentially saying, 'We'll pay any price per ton, we want to move this whole field forward.' I think that's really awesome."

Zelikova's expertise is in soil carbon sequestration, and she was one of the scientists hired by Stripe as consultants to review submissions. Ultimately the company did not go with any soil-based carbon removal projects, but Zelikova praised Stripe for seeking expert opinion and outside analysis and for making the entire process transparent. Stripe has shared its evaluation criteria online and encouraged other companies to use it, in addition to making all of the proposals it received available on GitHub.

"That is very impressive and I think very rare, the level of transparency and cooperation," said Zelikova. "I hope they serve as a template for how other people can do something similar."

Drone pioneer Wingcopter a winner of German Government COVID-19 hackathon - EU-Startups

Posted: 22 May 2020 03:45 AM PDT

Today Wingcopter, the developer of autonomous delivery drones for humanitarian and commercial applications, has been named one of nine winners of the #SmartDevelopmentHack. Through this global hackathon, the German Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) solicited innovative digital solutions to tackle the challenges caused by the coronavirus outbreak in low- and middle-income countries. The lineup of supporters included the European Commission (through EuropeAid), GIZ, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, Smart Africa, Technical University Munich, Oracle, SAP, and others. Each winning team will be awarded up to €3 million to implement their projects in-country.

We've had our eye on Wingcopter for a while now, and are excited to have them speak at the EU-Startups Summit in 2021, as well as having included them in our list of 10 German startups that will crush it in 2020 and beyond – despite Coronavirus. Founded in 2017, they are known speeding up life-saving medicine delivery for remote islands – true to the company's guiding principle "Technology with a Purpose". With its patented tilt-rotor mechanism the startup closes the gap between commercial drones, helicopters and fixed-wing aircraft, thus achieving a new dimension of efficiency.

After two intense days of hacking, Wingcopter, alongside its partners UNICEF and the African Drone and Data Academy (ADDA), came up with the concept to use Wingcopter drones to improve health supply chains during COVID-19 and to open up new long-term opportunities for youth in Africa. Thanks to a great collaboration, the funds awarded for the project will be split between Wingcopter and UNICEF/ADDA.

In more detail, the 18-month project will involve setting up a locally operated delivery drone network in Malawi, giving on-demand access to medical supplies such as COVID-19 test kits or vaccines (once available). At the same time, they will also build local capacity with two distinct training programmes for 160 Malawian youth. The locals taking part will get access to a virtual education platform, and selected students will be provided with the applicable technical equipment and pre-installed software (internet-free) to help them learn to assemble, operate, and maintain Wingcopter drones. Alongside the data analytics skills provided by ADDA, the Malawian students will be equipped with the tools to pursue new entrepreneurial or job opportunities, granting them new economic perspectives.

After proving the concept's viability and successful implementation in Malawi, Wingcopter and UNICEF plan to adapt the concept and scale to Rwanda.

Tom Plümmer, co-founder and CEO of Wingcopter, commented: "Wingcopter's long-term strategy involves developing a sustainable education platform for youth to enable them to participate in the rapidly growing drone market, offering new job and income opportunities and ultimately improving their quality of life. By providing both theoretical and practical training on our drones, we will help young people to enter the industrial drone sector faster and better equipped. This concept is fully in line with our vision and we are happy that the award recognizes and supports this approach".

As one of the poorest countries in the world, a widespread corona-induced lockdown would cause a substantial loss of economic activities in Malawi, costing millions of Malawians their livelihoods, while exposure to the virus could ultimately cost a substantial number their lives. So far, African countries have rather few confirmed COVID-19 infections, but medical experts are concerned that the number could be higher given the lack of testing. A widespread outbreak would have a severe impact on the already strained African healthcare systems as well as major economic repercussions.

Wingcopter has been active in Malawi and other African countries before, significantly shortening patients' waiting times by delivering medical commodities to hard-to-reach areas by drone. The eVTOL drones combine the advantages of multicopters (vertical take-off and landing) and fixed-wing airplanes (fast and efficient forward flight) due to its patented tilt-rotor technology. At the point of destination, the drones can lower the transported goods through a winch mechanism, requiring no landing infrastructure, before autonomously returning to the point of departure.

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